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Test your Political Compass
Citizen #381277

An old friend of mine sent me this and I found it quite interesting.

The Political Compass

If you click on the take the test link, you will be taken to a series of questions that will, apparently, determine your position on the "political compass". Now I won't spoil it all for you, but it's interesting to note that at the end, when they give you a little run down of major political players on this graph, Howard is more right than Shrubby*, who is more authoritarian than Howard. "What does all this mean?", I hear you cry, but bear with me. Howard is more open to neoliberalist tendencies, which some could say correlate to a being less authoritarian while Shrubby, being the fan of his little "War on Terrorism" is more authoritarian thus showing a greater tendency for the economic left.

Thus ends my rant. I now leave it open for Russ to destroy my ideas! ;)

General 13th November, 2003 21:42:06   [#] 

Comments

2D vs 1D
The Political Compass is far more accurate than the traditional left-right axis (on display now in the Labor Party near you!) because it takes into account your authoritarian and liberal tendencies.

According to this 2-dimensional model, it [i]is[/i] possible to be a tree-hugging hippy who think's it's okay to punish those who commit environmental crimes with capital or corporal punishment. Under the 1-dimensional left-right axis model, that hippy would be simply be lumped in a box with those who are more liberal in their approach to environmentalism.

A useful metaphor to explain authoritarianism and liberalism is that of the carrot and the stick. If you prefer the stick (i.e. punishing or preventing people doing things you don't want them to do) over the carrot (i.e. providing incentives to entice people away from doing the things you don't want them to do) - then you're [b]authoritarian[/b]. If you prefer the carrot to the stick - you're [b]liberal[/b]. If you like to use both in equal measures then, of course, you'll sit in the centre of the vertical axis.

I've done the test a number of times and each time I've landed in the same position - near the bottom, left-hand corner.

Unless you have friends who share your political views or are involved in the same faction of a political party (and even then - especially in parties like the Democrats), you'll probably find that there is a great diversity in where your friends sit on the political compass.

However, when someone develops a 3D model - the results may be a little more interesting and we may see some interesting correlations and similarities between those who are traditional rivals.
Aaron Hewett  27th November, 2003 15:01:27  

About time too!!
Well, it's good to see at least one person reading CvP!
Tom  30th November, 2003 17:18:26  


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